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DuPage Criminal Defense AttorneyIf you or a loved one has been threatened, stalked, or abused, you may be curious about orders of protection. Called restraining orders or protective orders in other states, an order of protection is a legal court order that prohibits the subject of the order from further abusing or harassing the victim.

Many domestic violence sufferers are aware of protection orders, but they do not understand how a protective order can actually benefit them. They may assume that the abuser will ignore the order and continue his or her harmful behavior. They may also worry that getting a protection order will only anger the abuser and worsen their situation. Read on to learn about how orders of protection work in Illinois and how seeking an order of protection can help you and your children escape an abusive situation.

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Lombard Criminal Defense LawyerBeing accused of a criminal offense can be a shocking experience. For many criminal defendants, the moments during and after an arrest are a blur. Unfortunately, many criminal defendants hurt their cases by making statements to police officers that are later used against them. Most people know that they have a “right to remain silent” during a police interaction but few realize just how profound this right actually is.  

Avoiding Self Incrimination

Whether you have been arrested before or you simply enjoy police procedural television shows, you have probably heard the statement, “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say or do may be used against you in court.” The Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is the foundation of our right to remain silent. The Fifth Amendment states that criminal defendants cannot be compelled, or forced, to testify against themselves. In other words, they have a right against self-incrimination.

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Lombard IL Legal Separation attorneyOne of the most challenging aspects of ending a marriage in Illinois is interpreting all of the legal jargon and terminology associated with divorce. When Illinois residents begin exploring their options for ending their marriage, one such term they may come across is “legal separation.” You may have questions like, “What does legal separation entail?” or “What is the difference between being separated and legally separated?” You may also be curious as to the potential benefits of seeking legal separation instead of divorce. Whatever your situation, an experienced family law attorney can help you explore your legal options and pursue the option that makes the most sense for you.

Legal Separation in Illinois

When a couple’s marriage breaks down, often, one of the spouses will move out of the marital home. The spouse may live with a friend or relative while the couple decides whether or not to formalize the split through a divorce. Living separately is not the same thing as being legally separated. When a couple pursues a legal separation in Illinois, they make important decisions about the allocation of parental responsibilities, formally called child custody, spousal support, child support, and the division of assets and debts. These decisions become legally binding court orders – just as they would during a divorce. However, the couple is still married.

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Lombard IL child support attorneyRaising a child with a disability can be an extremely meaningful and rewarding experience. However, it can also bring on significant personal and financial challenges. When a parent has a child with a disability, the child may need extra assistance with daily living tasks like dressing and eating. The child may also require extensive medical care, special education, or tutoring. For parents of disabled children, these challenges do not disappear when the child reaches age 18. Consequently, some divorced and unmarried parents are entitled to financial assistance from the other parent even after their child has reached adulthood.

Child Support for Adult Children with Disabilities

In Illinois, both parents are expected to financially contribute to their child’s needs even if they are unmarried or divorced. Child support obligations typically cease when the child turns 18 or completes high school.  However, If your child has an intellectual disability, developmental disability, physical impairment, or medical condition that limits his or her independence, you may be responsible for his or her care for many more years.  You can better ensure that you have the financial resources to provide for this care by petitioning for non-minor child support payments that continue beyond your child’s eighteenth birthday.

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Lombard IL DUI defense attorneyDriving under the influence may result in significant penalties in Illinois, including driver’s license suspension, mandatory alcohol education classes, and in some cases, even jail time. DUI penalties are especially severe if there are certain aggravating circumstances present or it is not the defendant’s first DUI. If you or a loved one was arrested and charged with drunk driving based on the results of a chemical blood alcohol content (BAC) test, you may wonder if these test results may be disputed.

Contesting the Result of a Breath Alcohol Test

In Illinois, a driver is intoxicated “per se,” or automatically considered to be intoxicated, if his or her blood alcohol content is 0.08 percent or greater. Most police officers carry a portable breath test often referred to as a breathalyzer. These preliminary tests are typically used to establish probable cause for the DUI arrest. However, the results of a preliminary roadside BAC test alone are not enough to secure a conviction. Usually, after someone is arrested for DUI, they are issued a secondary test at the police station. These evidentiary tests are considered to be more reliable than the roadside test. However, several issues can cause a BAC test to be inaccurate, including:

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address2200 S. Main Street, Suite 317, Lombard, IL 60148
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